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  • mdfavionics
    mdfavionics updated an article
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  • Mark
    Mark created a new forum post in ATA 24 Electrical Power
    Inbound write-up of a #1 IDG overheat advisory. The system had previous history and we had limited time to troubleshoot.

    IDG cooling is accomplished with two separate coolers. A fuel/oil cooler is used on a continual basis. A air/oil cooler is used at low engine power settings (less fuel flow for the cooling required) or when the oil temp climbs higher than 126 degrees C.

    The crew receives the advisory at 142 and a master caution at 185.

    The IDG oil level was verified to be normal. Over-filling will cause high temps. There was no smell of fuel in the oil (cracked fuel/oil exchanger). To rule out a indication issue, the temp bulbs were checked at the GCU rack. Two bulbs, one oil in - one oil out, can be checked at the GCU rack plug on three wires (one common between the two). The #1 engine's in/out read around 122 ohms approximately an hour after engine shut down. These readings matched the #2 engine.




    Troubleshooting beyond this point requires breaking into the cooling system. A clogged line or exchanger is possible, but the most likely culprit is the IDG itself.

    The deferral requires disconnecting the IDG drive from the gear box. The APU generator is used as an alternate power source until the IDG system is repaired.



    A300-600 AMM & ASM 24-11-00
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  • Mark
    Mark created a new forum post in Troubleshooting Tips
    We recently had an issue where the FCC's and FAC's were swapped for troubleshooting a stabilizer trim problem on a A300-600.
    The mechanic that did the work DID NOT include any AMM references for component testing. The mechanic DID NOT reference any downgrades to the Auto-Land or RVSM status. (He actually made a log entry stating the above.)

    Basically, this gentleman left his ass hanging out. Unfortunately, he left the mechanic responsible for dispatching the aircraft hanging also.

    Any time that flight control computers are un-assed from the rack...... some sort of documentation needs to be done. If functional checks are not accomplished, system downgrades will be mandatory.

    As soon as the first FCC came out of the rack, both the Auto-Land and RVSM statuses became void. If the aircraft was dispatched in this condition, it would of been illegal to fly in RVSM airspace and the Auto-Land function could not of been relied upon for a safe landing. The outbound crew most likely would have done both (and their ass's would be libel also).

    A follow up that included functional checks of ALL the related components and systems was accomplished before departure. All actions were recorded in the aircraft logs. These checks should of been accomplished after the previous troubleshooting was completed.

    The mechanic involved was actually pissed. He had no clue about his mistake and thought we were out to burn him. We did the exact opposite. We covered the whole thing. He wasn't reprimanded and he still has a job.
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  • Mark
    Mark created a new forum post in Working With Wires
    Environmental Splices should be used anytime a splice is needed outside the pressure vessel. This type of splice should also be used if there is any chance of liquid exposure.



    The splice is composed of two parts, the inner barrel, and the outer sleeve. The barrel provides a solid wire to wire connection. The sleeve has sealant on both ends. When heated, the sealant flows around the wire and the sleeve body shrinks. The splice completely isolates external elements to greatly reduce the chance of failure over time. Environmental splices are manufactured by Raychem®, they require the correct crimper be used.



    Quick Notes for Environmental Splices

    1. The AD-1377 crimper is used for barrel crimping. It places a double crimp on each side of the barrel.
    2. The crimp depth is important. The tool might need adjustment; the barrel as a tendency to bend along the length if the crimp is too tight.
    3. The placement of the color stripes on the barrel and sleeve are used for a reference only. It does not matter if they are matched.
    4. A good heat gun is needed. Having a curved tip adapter is also helpful. A considerable amount of heat is needed to allow for sealant flow. Portable heat guns normally do not have enough heat or flow. Butane torches will burn through the sleeve before sealant flow, they are not recommended.
    5. A good splice is characterized by two solid crimps on each wire and complete sleeve shrink with sealant flow on both sides.
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