News https://rotate.aero/blog/categories/eb-news Wed, 16 Oct 2019 01:48:13 +0000 MYOB en-gb Another Disaster? FAA Finds Cracks On Wings In 5% Of Older Boeing 737s https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/another-disaster-faa-finds-cracks-on-wings-in-5-of-older-boeing-737s-1 https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/another-disaster-faa-finds-cracks-on-wings-in-5-of-older-boeing-737s-1
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From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

At this rate, maybe President Trump is right, Boeing should change their name and rebrand the company. 

A new problem for Boeing has developed in the last several weeks, and it's not related to the 737 MAX, but rather an earlier 737, called the 737 Next Generation, or 737NG.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Fri, 11 Oct 2019 11:58:05 +0000
Boeing 'Whistleblower' Says Company Focused On Profit Over Safety Of Doomed 737 Max https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-whistleblower-says-company-focused-on-profit-over-safety-of-doomed-737-max https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-whistleblower-says-company-focused-on-profit-over-safety-of-doomed-737-max
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From Zero Hedge

Bombshell Report: Boeing 'Whistleblower' Says Company Focused On Profit Over Safety Of Doomed 737 Max

 

By Tyler Durden

The New York Times has published a bombshell report about a new complaint filed against Boeing by a senior engineer, alleging the aircraft maker concentrated on prioritizing profits over the safety of the 737 Max airliner.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 02 Oct 2019 22:53:19 +0000
737 MAX Certification Could Open Big Rifts in Global Aviation Market https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/737-max-certification-could-open-big-rifts-in-global-aviation-market https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/737-max-certification-could-open-big-rifts-in-global-aviation-market
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From engineering.com

By Matthew Greenwood

The European air safety regulator could break with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on certifying the Boeing 737 MAX for flight again—which could cause significant turmoil in the global aviation sector.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is insisting on conducting its own flight tests of the aircraft before allowing it to fly again in Europe—rather than just relying on FAA certification.

“EASA intends to conduct its own test flights separate from, but in full coordination with, the FAA,” said agency spokesperson Janet Northcote. “The test flights are not scheduled yet. The date will depend on the development schedule of Boeing.”

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 25 Sep 2019 10:41:37 +0000
Boeing Faces First Customer Lawsuit Over 737 MAX https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-faces-first-customer-lawsuit-over-737-max https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-faces-first-customer-lawsuit-over-737-max
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From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

Expectations that the Boeing 737 MAX 8 will return to the skies any time in the near future have largely faded, and now, after dedicating billions of dollars to compensating customers, Boeing is finally facing their wrath in the courtroom. The FT reports that a Russian aircraft-leasing company has filed a lawsuit against the aerospace company seeking not only the return of the deposit it paid for the 35 MAX 8s that it ordered, but also punitive damages in the hundreds of millions.

Avia Capital Services, a subsidiary of Russian state conglomerate Rostec, accused Boeing of "negligent actions and decisions" that led to two deadly accidents and roughly 350 deaths. Regulators around the world grounded the 737 MAX 8 in response to the accidents, and investigations have pointed toward issues with the plane's software as the culprit.

In its lawsuit, Avia also claimed that the design of the MAX 8 was "defective", and - embracing a more conspiratorial tone - that Boeing knew about these defects bu withheld this "critical information" from US regulators and Boeing's customers.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Tue, 27 Aug 2019 18:17:59 +0000
Boeing will hire hundreds..... as it prepares for 737 MAX’s return to service https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-will-hire-hundreds-as-it-prepares-for-737-max-s-return-to-service https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-will-hire-hundreds-as-it-prepares-for-737-max-s-return-to-service
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From The Seattle Times

Boeing will hire hundreds of temporary employees at Moses Lake as it prepares for 737 MAX’s return to service.

By Dominic Gates

Boeing said Tuesday it will begin hiring a few hundred temporary employees at Moses Lake to work on the grounded 737 MAX fleet and prepare the planes for return to service once regulators gives them clearance to fly again.

The company, which will provide paid housing and a meal allowance for the temporary hires, is looking for avionics technicians, aircraft mechanics, airframe and engine mechanics, and aircraft electricians.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Fri, 23 Aug 2019 03:48:38 +0000
Latest 737 Max Fault... Rooted In Software https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/latest-737-max-fault-rooted-in-software https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/latest-737-max-fault-rooted-in-software

From Bloomberg

Latest 737 Max Fault That Alarmed Test Pilots Rooted in Software

By Alan Levin

As U.S. government test pilots ran through dozens of flight scenarios on the Boeing Co. 737 Max in recent weeks, a potential failure got their attention.

The plane’s flight computer tried to push the aircraft’s nose down repeatedly during a simulator run, prompted by a stream of erroneous flight data. The Federal Aviation Administration pilot concluded commercial pilots might not have time to react and avoid a tragedy in a real plane.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Sat, 10 Aug 2019 18:40:34 +0000
Southwest Ends Flights Out Of Newark Airport https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/southwest-ends-flights-out-of-newark-airport https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/southwest-ends-flights-out-of-newark-airport

From Zero Hedge

Southwest Ends Flights Out Of Newark Airport As 737 MAX Grounding Takes Its Toll

By Tyler Durden

When Southwest reported its earnings Thursday morning, it also made a stunning announcement that shows just how badly the 737 MAX 8's best customer has been hurt by the grounding.

Just as Boeing warns that it could halt production of the troublesome 737 MAX 8 if the plane's return to the skies is delayed any longer, Southwest Airlines, the 737 MAX 8's best customer, is reportedly planning to cease operations at Newark Airport. The decision is a direct result of the 737 MAX 8's grounding.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Thu, 25 Jul 2019 13:12:20 +0000
Boeing Thinks A Human Life Is Worth Just $150,000 https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-thinks-a-human-life-is-worth-just-150-000 https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-thinks-a-human-life-is-worth-just-150-000

From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

Two weeks ago, we noted how, after ignoring them for months (presumably at the behest of its legal department), Boeing had decided to dedicate $100 million (roughly 1% of its 2018 revenue) to the families of the victims from the Lion Air and Ethiopian Air crashes. However, that number came with a catch: Some of the money would be used for 'community development' and 'education efforts'.

Split among the families of the 346 victims, at $100 million, each family would receive just under $300,000 - a pittance when one considers that this is compensation meant to offset the taking of a human life.

But as it turns out, the families won't even get that much, because as CNBC reported on Wednesday, Boeing is planning to distribute only $50 million to the families of victims, and will retain Ken Feinberg (famous for being the special master of the US government's Sept. 11 Victim Compensation Fund) as co-administrator of victims' fund. The rest will presumably go to these unspecified initiatives that the company has mentioned.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 17 Jul 2019 17:52:43 +0000
Boeing Loses $5.9 Billion 737 MAX Order To Airbus As Saudi Airline Loses Patience https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-loses-5-9-billion-737-max-order-to-airbus-as-saudi-airline-loses-patience https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-loses-5-9-billion-737-max-order-to-airbus-as-saudi-airline-loses-patience

From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

The Saudi budget airline Flyadeal has lost patience with the ongoing grounding of Boeing's flagship 737 MAX airplane, and on Sunday announced it would not proceed with a $5.9 billion order for 30 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, instead opting for a fleet of Airbus A320 jets, with options for a further 20 of the jets.

According to Reuters, Flyadeal has been reconsidering a commitment to order the Boeing jets after two MAX aircraft crashed in Ethiopia in March and Indonesia last October, and which killed a total of 346 people, triggering the global grounding of the aircraft and wiped billions off Boeing’s market value. On Sunday, it finally pulled the plug when it announced it would take delivery of 30 A320 neos ordered by its parent, state-owned Saudi Arabian Airlines, at the Paris Air Show in June.

“This order will result in flyadeal operating an all-Airbus A320 fleet in the future,” it said.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Mon, 08 Jul 2019 22:23:13 +0000
Why Boeing May Never Recover From 737 Debacle https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/why-boeing-may-never-recover-from-737-debacle https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/why-boeing-may-never-recover-from-737-debacle
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Via Zero Hedge

Authored by Marshall Auerback, this article was produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute,

Many of us are familiar with the acronym “FUBAR.” A recent New York Times article on the Boeing 737 fiasco provides a perfect illustration of the concept. We’re now learning that the company “built deadly assumptions” into its newly designed 737 Max aircraft and, specifically, its Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS).

Even worse, the Times account concludes that the recent air crashes that have resulted in a worldwide grounding of the Boeing Max plane “might have been avoided, if employees and regulators had a better understanding of MCAS” and if the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) itself was not operating with outdated data on the software changes (which Boeing failed to provide).

The analysis is excellent as far as it goes. But the most damning fact only briefly hinted at in the article is that the problems were evident as early as 2012, some five years before the newest 737 version was marketed and sold across the globe.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Sat, 22 Jun 2019 14:48:27 +0000
It's Airbus 13,000,000,000 - Boeing 0, On The First Day Of The Paris Air Show https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/it-s-airbus-13-000-000-000-boeing-0-on-the-first-day-of-the-paris-air-show https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/it-s-airbus-13-000-000-000-boeing-0-on-the-first-day-of-the-paris-air-show

From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

As the jarring truth about Boeing's "cost-cutting above all" philosophy involving the company's deadly, ill-fated 737 MAX (or whatever the company's ill-fated plane may be called soon) receives an ever-wider public appreciation, the company is finding it increasingly difficult to do business as usual.

Take the Paris Air Show, traditionally the venue where the world's largest aircraft makers lock in deals worth tens of billions of dollars. Well, the first day of the 2019 edition of this boondoggle couldn't have gone any worse for Boeing, and alternatively it couldn't have been better for Airbus, which locked in $13 billion in orders for new jets.

Boeing's tally? $0.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 19 Jun 2019 10:49:18 +0000
Is the Second Antonov AN-225 Close to Completion? https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/is-the-second-antonov-an-225-close-to-completion https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/is-the-second-antonov-an-225-close-to-completion
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From Aviation Tribune

By Aviation Tribune

The Antonov AN-225 is known to be the largest cargo aircraft in the world. Developed in the 1980’s, so far just one model has been introduced onto the market. However, a second Antonov AN-225 which has been in development since the cold war, is now speculated to be near to completion.

So, just how close to completion is the second Antonov AN-225 and why has the aircraft generated such a huge reputation?

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Tue, 11 Jun 2019 12:22:12 +0000
FAA Says No Timetable For MAX Return https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/faa-says-no-timetable-for-max-return https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/faa-says-no-timetable-for-max-return

From Airline Ratings

By Steve Creedy

There is no timetable to return the Boeing 737 MAX back to flight and the decision will depend solely on whether or not the jet is deemed to be safe, a senior US Federal Aviation Administration official has said.

The comments came as the FAA and representatives of other global regulators met in an attempt to get a co-ordinated response to the grounding of the 737 MAX fleet after two fatal accidents.

Elwell was asked whether airlines that had taken the MAX out of their schedules would need to revise their plans to take into account a longer wait.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Fri, 31 May 2019 12:46:50 +0000
Did The FAA Drop The Ball While Certifying Boeing Anti-Stall Software Suspected In 2 Deadly Crashes? https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/did-the-faa-drop-the-ball-while-certifying-boeing-anti-stall-software-suspected-in-2-deadly-crashes https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/did-the-faa-drop-the-ball-while-certifying-boeing-anti-stall-software-suspected-in-2-deadly-crashes

From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

It seems like barely a day goes by without the Wall Street Journal or some other news organization publishing some alarming scoop about oversights or unexplained lapses at Boeing or the FAA during the certification process of the 737 MAX 8.

We've already learned that Boeing didn't realize until after the Lion Air crash back in October that a warning system meant to alert pilots when MCAS - the anti-stall software suspected in contributing to two deadly crashes - was malfunctioning had been made an optional feature on all of the 737 8s it sold to Southwest, its largest customer. And neither did the FAA.

Now, ahead of a hearing before a House Transportation subcommittee on Wednesday, WSJ is reporting that senior FAA officials weren't involved in the agency's review of MCAS, despite the unprecedented power delegated to the system in the new generation of 737s, because the agency viewed the system as a "non-critical safety risk."

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 15 May 2019 13:18:53 +0000
Why Boeing’s emergency directions may have failed to save 737 MAX https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/why-boeing-s-emergency-directions-may-have-failed-to-save-737-max https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/why-boeing-s-emergency-directions-may-have-failed-to-save-737-max
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From The Seattle Times

By Dominic Gates

The pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX that crashed last month appear to have followed the emergency procedure laid out by both Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration — cutting off the suspect flight-control system — but could not regain control and avert the plunge that killed all 157 on board.

Press reports citing people briefed on the crash investigation’s preliminary findings said the pilots hit the system-cutoff switches as Boeing had instructed after October’s Lion Air MAX crash, but couldn’t get the plane’s nose back up. They then turned the system back on before the plane nose-dived into the ground.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Sat, 11 May 2019 20:15:27 +0000
Boeing Suppliers Headed For Pain Amid Max Crisis https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-suppliers-headed-for-pain-amid-max-crisis https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-suppliers-headed-for-pain-amid-max-crisis
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From Zero Hedge

Last month, we reported that Boeing slashed production of the troubled 737 Max from 52 to 42 airplanes per month. Now, a new report from the Financial Times shows how production cuts are set to drive some of the company's suppliers into financial hardship.

Spirit AeroSystems, a 737 Max supplier that produces 70% of the plane's aerostructure, pulled its 2019 financial guidance, warning that past guidance is no longer valid because of the production cuts and no visible timeframe of when the planes will be back in the air.

Financial Times notes that Spirit AeroSystems is for right now, insulated from the cuts because it worked out a deal with Boeing to continue producing at the old rate (52 planes). The supplier is quickly building inventory at its facilities. They're only a few of the suppliers that are producing at the old rate, while others have transitioned to 42 per month, a 20% decline from the old rate.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Tue, 07 May 2019 15:40:30 +0000
Boeing Admits 'Mistakes Were Made' During Development Of 737 MAX 8 https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-admits-mistakes-were-made-during-development-of-737-max-8 https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-admits-mistakes-were-made-during-development-of-737-max-8
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From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

Following a series of conflicting reports claiming that Boeing didn't inform the FAA or Southwest, the largest buyer of its 737 MAX 8 planes, that a safety alert warning pilots that an 'angle-of-attack' sensor on the planes might be feeding the system erroneous data, risking a misfire of the plane's anti-stall software, had been made an 'optional' safety feature, Boeing has admitted that it wasn't aware that the alerts had been disabled when it initially delivered the planes, and that it waited more than 13 months, until after the Oct. 29 crash of a 737 MAX 8 owned by Indonesia's Lion Air, to inform its regulator that it had inadvertently disabled the alerts.

A series of reports by the Wall Street Journal over the past two weeks uncovered the fact that Boeing had made the alerts - which it insists were not a critically important safety feature - optional. Shortly after that initial report, WSJ published a follow up suggesting that Boeing's decision to disable the alerts was inadvertent, though a spokesman declined to elaborate about how this happened.

Finally, on Sunday, Reuters and WSJ confirmed that the decision was, in fact, unintentional, but Boeing still waited to inform its regulator and its customers that the alerts had been disabled on planes that didn't include an 'optional' package of additional safety figures.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Mon, 06 May 2019 23:00:48 +0000
Boeing Didn't Tell Southwest Or FAA That It Had Disabled Critical Safety Alerts On 737 MAX https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-didn-t-tell-southwest-or-faa-that-it-had-disabled-critical-safety-alerts-on-737-max https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-didn-t-tell-southwest-or-faa-that-it-had-disabled-critical-safety-alerts-on-737-max

From Zero Hedge

By Tyler Durden

It was a bad enough look for Boeing when reporters uncovered the company's decision to make some safety features optional on its 737 MAX 8s. Worse still that this decision was only made public after the deadly crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 just minutes after takeoff on March 10 - the second deadly crash involving the plane in six months, which spurred regulators around the world to ground the planes, erasing billions of dollars of Boeing market cap.

But a report in the Wall Street Journal published on Sunday that neither Southwest Airlines nor the FAA (Boeing's primary federal regulator) were aware that a safety feature intended to alert pilots to a potentially malfunctioning 'angle of attack' sensor - in other words, a feature that might have prevented both the crash of ET302 and the Oct. 29 crash of a 737 owned by Lion Air - had been disabled on the new 737s is simply staggering.

Not only did Boeing disable the alerts, which would notify pilots when the two sensors on the new 737 MAX 8s were reporting dramatically different data, and make them part of a new 'premium' package of safety features, but the manufacturer somehow neglected to tell the airline and its regulator that the alerts had been disabled. The result was that Southwest never updated its safety manuals for pilots to reflect the fact that the alerts had been disabled.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Sun, 28 Apr 2019 16:32:54 +0000
Boeing Hits Back at New York Times’ “Inaccurate” Reporting https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-hits-back-at-new-york-times-inaccurate-reporting https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-hits-back-at-new-york-times-inaccurate-reporting
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From Airline Ratings

By Geoffrey Thomas and Steve Creedy April 22, 2019

Boeing has hit back at a New York Times’ article about the production quality of the 787s being built at the company’s South Carolina plant.

The NYT’s article, which has been distributed widely, claimed that Boeing’s factory in Charleston, South Carolina, has been plagued by shoddy construction and weak oversight.

Citing internal emails, corporate documents, federal records as well as interviews with former and current employees, the story claimed Boeing pushed its workforce to quickly turn out Dreamliners while ignoring issues raised by some employees.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Wed, 24 Apr 2019 11:42:13 +0000
Boeing's Nightmare Continues https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-s-nightmare-continues https://rotate.aero/blog/entry/boeing-s-nightmare-continues
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From Zero Hedge

Boeing's Nightmare Continues: Dreamliner Workers Warn Of Defective Manufacturing, Dangerous Quality Lapses

By Tyler Durden

Just as it looked like the fallout from the Boeing 737 MAX crashes was finally fading into the background, the New York Times is raising new questions about an entirely different Boeing plane, the Dreamliner 787. Workers at a Boeing plant in South Carolina are complaining about "defective manufacturing, debris left on planes and pressure to not report violations".

An investigation that incorporated reviewing hundreds of emails and documents, as well as interviews with more than a dozen current and former employees, has arrived at the conclusion that Boeing pushed speed over quality when it came to its Dreamliners - a story similar to the 737 MAX, which we reported faced similar critiques. This has lead to the question whether the issues at Boeing are limited to the 737, or if they are systemic.

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contact@rotate.aero (Mark) News Mon, 22 Apr 2019 20:56:56 +0000